Molyneux & Rand, childhood experience of insecure man on steroids VS John Galt the ideal man

Bruno's picture
Submitted by Bruno on Mon, 2018-04-16 10:02

A man uses anabolic steroids to get women's attention, but Stefan Molyneux gets much deeper into the root causes of this behavior.

No surprise, it's adverse childhood experience that has melded into this man his insecurity and lack of self-esteem.

I commend Stefan Molyneux and bring his Ayn Rand background to the discussion. Is a John Galt ideal man possible if we do not get rid of terrible parenting practices?

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Wet nurse

Bruno's picture

You're right about the wet nurse line in AS. It would have been a good quotation to read out loud in the video.

> The problem with your

Alan Forrester's picture

> The problem with your Taking Children Seriously is the David Deutsch and, to a lesser extent, Karl Popper influences.
>
> Deutsch propounds the multi–universe

Do you have a criticism of the multiverse approach to understanding quantum theory or could you link to a criticism?

And what does the multiverse have to do with TCS?

> while Popper says that implications from Einstein’s theorem are unreliable (true in many instances).

What is Einstein's theorem and what is its relevance to TCS?

> They are at odds.

In what respect are they at odds?

> Popper did not take context into his argument versus inductive theory.

Can you explain this point more, or link to an explanation?

JustinCEO

gregster's picture

The problem with your Taking Children Seriously is the David Deutsch and, to a lesser extent, Karl Popper influences.

Deutsch propounds the multi–universe, while Popper says that implications from Einstein’s theorem are unreliable (true in many instances).

They are at odds.

Popper did not take context into his argument versus inductive theory. His epistemology was incorrect, perhaps the result of far too many Canterbury ales.

But children would hardly notice it. But as the link says about Santa Claus, the same holds for any god, and to greater detriment to the child.

Once the child realises there is more than one game going on, his respect is lost.

Rational Parenting Philosophy

JustinCEO's picture

I disagree with a lot of what was said in the video, but the general topic of rational parenting is one of great importance, so in this post I'll focus on an idea that might be of interest to many on this board.

Objectivists interested in a unique perspective on this topic may want to research Taking Children Seriously (TCS). http://fallibleideas.com/takin...

TCS is an idea/movement that's been around for a while and that emphasizes the importance of reason in parenting (and which places great emphasis on the importance of epistemology for parenting, learning, and life). It is a very liberal (in the old, good, true sense) parenting philosophy which I think lots of people could benefit from reading about.

If you get interested in it and wanna ask some questions of experts, discussion of TCS is welcome on the Fallible Ideas list http://fallibleideas.com/discu...

I'm also happy to discuss TCS here.

Have a nice Saturday and good premises Smiling

Possibilities

Jmaurone's picture

"Is a John Galt ideal man possible if we do not get rid of terrible parenting practices?"

"What's that Jesuit saying? "Give us a child for the first 7 years, and we'll give you the man?"

Putting aside the possibility of (to the level of genius, or extent of ability, etc), or the desirability of a literal John Galt (one's version of the "ideal" may vary)...I'd say, and largely from personal experience, that it IS possible for some, but very difficult. And going into Molyneux terriority, depending on the severity, possibly not. And not only impossible, but the reverse happens, where you get criminal behavior.

Stanton Samenow talks about early intervention in INSIDE THE CRIMINAL MIND, and how if certain children don't get that intervention, that resulting adult may have behaviors and ideas so ingrained that it's nearly impossible to change them, later.

Dr. Michael Hurd, who highly recommends Samenow, uses cognitive therapy with his patients, has also talked about this, abusive parents, and adult children who try to change them (as well as anyone trying to help another by getting them into therapy. That their cognitive habits are so ingrained, that their sense-of-life is so warped that they will never change. And if their is a chance, is has to come from within, not from without.

Ayn Rand pretty much said the same, in her essay "The Comprachicos".

This, of course, doesn't even begin to take in to account genetics, etc...but I agree with Molyneux, Rand, Samenow, etc...early childhood is crucial, and so is good parenting. Whatever else helps or hinders a child's development, and whatever nature contributes or takes away, there's no reason to make the child's personal trek that much harder through shoddy parenting.

(Right there, I'd quote that passage from ATLAS, re: Rearden and the Wet Nurse, regarding the mama bird ripping off the baby's wings in order to teach it to fly...)

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