Sartreist existentialism, surrealism and capitalism

Lance's picture
Submitted by Lance on Wed, 2007-09-19 21:17

1. Textual neocapitalist theory and Marxist socialism
In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a semiotic theory that includes consciousness as a whole. Several discourses concerning not theory, but subtheory exist.

If one examines Marxist socialism, one is faced with a choice: either reject postconceptual rationalism or conclude that language is part of the economy of consciousness. But the premise of Sontagist camp implies that the task of the reader is social comment, but only if narrativity is distinct from sexuality; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of Marxist socialism is one of “neotextual deconceptualism”, and hence used in the service of capitalism. Debord promotes the use of postconceptual rationalism to challenge hierarchy.

“Sexual identity is part of the defining characteristic of reality,” says Sartre. Thus, Foucault’s critique of surrealism holds that the Constitution is capable of significance. The subject is contextualised into a postconceptual rationalism that includes culture as a totality.

In a sense, the main theme of McElwaine’s[1] essay on Marxist socialism is the role of the observer as writer. Derrida suggests the use of the deconstructivist paradigm of consensus to modify society.

Thus, Lyotard uses the term ’surrealism’ to denote the meaninglessness, and therefore the dialectic, of submaterial class. If semanticist sublimation holds, we have to choose between surrealism and predialectic discourse.

It could be said that the ground/figure distinction depicted in Smith’s Clerks emerges again in Chasing Amy. Postconceptual rationalism implies that art may be used to disempower the Other.

But the primary theme of the works of Smith is a textual whole. Bataille uses the term ‘the subdeconstructive paradigm of reality’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

2. Smith and surrealism
If one examines capitalist narrative, one is faced with a choice: either accept surrealism or conclude that society has significance. Thus, the characteristic theme of Bailey’s[2] model of postconceptual rationalism is not, in fact, discourse, but postdiscourse. A number of situationisms concerning Marxist socialism may be revealed.

“Sexual identity is a legal fiction,” says Lyotard; however, according to Wilson[3] , it is not so much sexual identity that is a legal fiction, but rather the fatal flaw of sexual identity. However, Finnis[4] states that we have to choose between subtextual theory and semiotic sublimation. The subject is interpolated into a surrealism that includes culture as a totality.

The primary theme of the works of Gaiman is the genre, and eventually the futility, of prematerialist truth. But if Marxist socialism holds, we have to choose between surrealism and dialectic nihilism. The characteristic theme of Sargeant’s[5] critique of Batailleist `powerful communication’ is not discourse as such, but neodiscourse.

In the works of Gaiman, a predominant concept is the concept of subcultural art. However, the premise of postconceptual rationalism suggests that sexuality is capable of significant form, but only if Marxist socialism is valid; otherwise, narrative is a product of the collective unconscious. The primary theme of the works of Gaiman is a self-fulfilling whole.

If one examines surrealism, one is faced with a choice: either reject dialectic desituationism or conclude that society, ironically, has intrinsic meaning. Thus, Foucault uses the term ‘postconceptual rationalism’ to denote the role of the observer as reader. The characteristic theme of Finnis’s[6] model of subsemiotic cultural theory is the difference between sexual identity and society.

“Sexual identity is part of the futility of truth,” says Sontag; however, according to la Fournier[7] , it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the futility of truth, but rather the absurdity, and hence the economy, of sexual identity. However, Baudrillard’s critique of Marxist socialism states that the significance of the writer is social comment. The main theme of the works of Fellini is not discourse, but prediscourse.

But the premise of surrealism implies that sexuality is used to reinforce the status quo, but only if consciousness is equal to language. An abundance of theories concerning a mythopoetical totality exist.

However, the primary theme of Hubbard’s[8] model of postconceptual rationalism is the bridge between narrativity and society. Debord uses the term ‘Marxist socialism’ to denote the role of the artist as participant.

It could be said that Lyotard’s analysis of postconceptual rationalism holds that the goal of the artist is deconstruction. Debord uses the term ’surrealism’ to denote the dialectic of cultural art.

Thus, the subject is contextualised into a Marxist socialism that includes language as a reality. Marx uses the term ‘postconceptual rationalism’ to denote the role of the reader as artist.

However, the subject is interpolated into a surrealism that includes reality as a whole. Lyotard promotes the use of Marxist socialism to attack class divisions.

Therefore, Baudrillard uses the term ‘precapitalist capitalism’ to denote the failure, and subsequent fatal flaw, of constructive class. McElwaine[9] suggests that we have to choose between postconceptual rationalism and neocultural textual theory.

However, several constructions concerning Marxist socialism may be found. The premise of surrealism states that culture serves to marginalize minorities, given that Foucault’s critique of Marxist socialism is invalid.

Thus, if the precultural paradigm of consensus holds, we have to choose between Marxist socialism and Debordist situation. Many narratives concerning the role of the reader as participant exist.

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1. McElwaine, A. (1974) Contexts of Absurdity: Postconceptual rationalism and surrealism. University of California Press

2. Bailey, G. J. ed. (1992) Surrealism and postconceptual rationalism. And/Or Press

3. Wilson, R. (1986) Forgetting Sartre: Postconceptual rationalism in the works of Gaiman. University of Massachusetts Press

4. Finnis, O. D. R. ed. (1990) Semanticist rationalism, capitalism and surrealism. Harvard University Press

5. Sargeant, H. D. (1984) Consensuses of Fatal flaw: Surrealism in the works of Mapplethorpe. Panic Button Books

6. Finnis, T. U. Y. ed. (1990) Postconceptual rationalism and surrealism. Schlangekraft

7. la Fournier, J. O. (1985) The Stasis of Reality: Postconceptual rationalism in the works of Fellini. Loompanics

8. Hubbard, A. U. H. ed. (1973) Surrealism and postconceptual rationalism. And/Or Press

9. McElwaine, L. O. (1997) Deconstructing Constructivism: Surrealism in the works of Spelling. University of Georgia Press

10. The essay you have just seen is completely meaningless and was randomly generated by the Postmodernism Generator. To generate another essay, follow this link.


( categories: )

Resistentialism

NickOtani's picture

I only know that Baker did make that statement:"The goal of all inanimate objects is to resist man and ultimately defeat him." I'm not sure what other contributions he made to this theory, which was originated by Paul Jennings and is a spoof of Sartre, who seemed to like the idea that man is the subject, the for-itself, with control over objects, the in-itself. He only feared other men who have the power to objectify him. He said, "Hell is other people." However, Jennings gives us examples of how we try to coil up a water hose and leave it in the shed only to find the next day that it uncoiled itself and tied the bicycle to the lawnmower. These objects, with fixed natures, seem to have minds of their own, and free-will. Perhaps man is in Hell even without other people, even with just things.

bis bald,

Nick

To wit: "The goal of all

Lance's picture

To wit: "The goal of all inanimate objects is to resist man and ultimately defeat him."

BTW, you gott'a admit, that

Lance's picture

BTW, you gott'a admit, that Russell Baker thing is pretty good.

Yes, touche Laughing out loud

Tell me, do you lend any validity to Baker's thoughts on Resistentialism?

Oh, my goodness!

NickOtani's picture

I didn't know it was my burden to show any evidence for my conditional statement. However, I did seriously attempt not to take this seriously at all, so as to fit in and be accepted as one of the guys, in the spirit of the shrew in Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew. I do think I do take myself too seriously at times, and I am seriously trying to rectify this social deficiency. Toward this end, I copied the following two paragraphs from the page that generates the postmodernistic essays:

“Sexual identity is part of the rubicon of truth,” says Foucault; however, according to de Selby, it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the rubicon of truth, but rather the failure, and thus the rubicon, of sexual identity. However, if pretextual deappropriation holds, we have to choose between social realism and postsemioticist construction. Many desituationisms concerning not narrative, as Marx would have it, but neonarrative may be found.

If one examines pretextual deappropriation, one is faced with a choice: either reject social realism or conclude that the establishment is intrinsically dead. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a precapitalist textual theory that includes culture as a reality. Sartre suggests the use of pretextual deappropriation to attack the status quo.

BTW, you gott'a admit, that Russell Baker thing is pretty good.

bis bald,

Nick

But Nick you have completely

Lance's picture

But Nick you have completely failed to show any evidence that subdialectic feminism could possibly be invalid. Further your argument smacks of sarcasm and I don't think you are taking this seriously at all Sticking out tongue Eye.

Alan Sokal tried an interesting experiment in 1996. He submitted the subtly nonsensical "Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity" to the pomowanker, but highly respectable journal Social Text. Story and article in the link

Ahhh, but Lance

NickOtani's picture

if subdialectic feminism is not valid, it may not follow that one is faced with the choice of rejecting capitalist dematerialism or concluding that culture has significance, if one examines textual desituationism. One may wonder what Buxton would have to say about Derrida and deconstruction of the dialectic pretextual theory.

BTW, once upon a point in time a diminutive person with the nomenclature of Little Red Riding Hood initiated plans for the transportation and delivery of foodstuff to her grandmother’s residence in a forest of indeterminate dimension. She was in mid-transportation process when she achieved interface with a wolf, who made inquiry, displaying a huge jaw capability, as to her destination and such. (Ahh, but that’s another story, attributed to Russell Baker.)

Bis bald,

Nick

Samuel Beckett

Grace's picture

I make one frustrated comment about why people have to keep writing huge diatribes that are so unenjoyable to read, so I don't, and you respond with this? Smiling

It is not too dissimiliar to reading a Samuel Beckett novel, except he was all about the small words.

Ahhh yes but Nick

Lance's picture

if one examines textual desituationism, one is faced with a choice: either reject capitalist dematerialism or conclude that culture has significance, given that subdialectic feminism is valid. A number of narratives concerning the common ground between sexual identity and narrativity may be discovered. Therefore, Buxton suggests that we have to choose between dialectic pretextual theory and dialectic construction.

You see?

An Ayn Rand essay?

NickOtani's picture

I am wondering if NickOtani has a similar "Neo-Objectivist" generator?

Hey, that stuff makes about as much sense as does Objectivism. However, it is probably how NickOtani'sNeo-Objectivism sounds to the typical Objectivist on this board.

bis bald,

Nick

"Are you sure you didn't

Lance's picture

"Are you sure you didn't just copy a page from a Ayn Rand essay?"

Haha no Sticking out tongue (I "feel your pain" though).

I am wondering if NickOtani has a similar "Neo-Objectivist" generator?

Whoaaaaa ha ha ha, I was about to respond when...

dinther's picture

I was going to spit more fire complaining about ...isms but this is cool, I love it. Exactly my point!  But uh.... Are you sure you didn't just copy a page from a Ayn Rand essay?

And here was I ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... thinking Sciabarra had rejoined SOLO. Smiling

[Oh, just read the last

Lance's picture

[Oh, just read the last sentence. You should really put that first, Lance, as not many are going make it to the end]

And spoil the fun? Sticking out tongue

On the contrary

Lance's picture

“Class is part of the failure of art,” says Derrida; however, according to de Selby, it is not so much class that is part of the failure of art, but rather the rubicon, and hence the collapse, of class. Sontag promotes the use of the precapitalist paradigm of reality to attack sexism. However, if the subdialectic paradigm of context holds, we have to choose between the precapitalist paradigm of reality and premodernist discourse.

If one examines semanticist postcapitalist theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept the material paradigm of expression or conclude that language is used to exploit the Other, given that culture is interchangeable with art. The characteristic theme of Abian’s essay on the precapitalist paradigm of reality is a postcapitalist reality. Therefore, Finnis suggests that we have to choose between the subdialectic paradigm of context and substructuralist theory.

An abundance of sublimations concerning the role of the poet as participant exist. But if semanticist postcapitalist theory holds, we have to choose between modern nihilism and precultural dialectic theory.

The primary theme of the works of Burroughs is a mythopoetical paradox. Therefore, Debord’s critique of semanticist postcapitalist theory states that reality must come from communication.

The masculine/feminine distinction intrinsic to Burroughs’s The Last Words of Dutch Schultz emerges again in Queer, although in a more subcapitalist sense. However, the subject is interpolated into a Marxist capitalism that includes language as a reality.

Foucault uses the term ’semanticist postcapitalist theory’ to denote the role of the artist as poet. It could be said that von Junz holds that the works of Burroughs are not postmodern.

dinther, are you getting

Mark Hubbard's picture

dinther, are you getting this Smiling

I have a lot to thank Foucault and Derrida for. My first degree was a Bachelor of Arts in English literature, which went well. I was then one month into a Master of Arts and I hit the wall of these two gentlemen. Even in my heavily stoned state of the time I realised it was the path to artistic/aesthetic suicide so I dropped out of the program, had a think about what I could do with my BA, given even if I succeeded in writing the great NZ novel I still couldn't make a living from it, thus, was only fit to teach, but hated kids, thus, all clearing the way to go back two years later and get undergraduate then postgraduate accountancy degrees, and hence make money (with the theory being go for early semi-retirement and then do the things that were really important to me (on my financial terms). (Oh, spent the two years in between working for long enough to get the money to do nothing but write, however, ended up mainly smoking the pleasant stuff (due to the corruption of an evil woman, obviously Smiling)

But I digress. Foucault and Derrida: nothing good can come of it Lance!

 

[Oh, just read the last sentence. You should really put that first, Lance, as not many are going make it to the end Smiling ]

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