The Movie Thread

Lindsay Perigo's picture
Submitted by Lindsay Perigo on Sun, 2009-10-11 07:26

If like me you haven't yet seen Dark Knight it's just about to screen on Sky Movie Channels 1 & 2.


Gay drama

Lindsay Perigo's picture

Third and final part of "Line of Beauty" on shortly on UKTV. Never mind the bollocks about how it's a masterful commentary on Thatcher's Britain, AIDS, blah, blah, blah. Just enjoy a rattling good yarn, terrific acting, sharp scripting, and gorgeous men.

Toast of New Orleans...

Olivia's picture

was just wonderful last night! Full of fun, laughter, joy and fabulous music. Mario's character "Pepe" is beautiful! So bent on joy with incorrigible confidence. They don't make movies like that any longer.

Mario's ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... Toast of New Orleans on TCM tonight, 10.25, and 2.25 pm tomorrow. Fluff, funny. All his movies showing this month, including Great Caruso on his birthday, Jan 31.

West Side Story ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... just concluding on TCM. Romeo and Juliet updated. But really, the horror of mindless groupist sacrificialism such as this is as old as the hills, unfortunately.

Last night MGM screened the brilliant Twelve Angry Men (the most recent remake, 1994). I was struck by how it included an adwanker who wanted to "run it up the flagpole," "put out some soup, see how many cats lick it up," etc..

And Churchill's grand-daughter ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... on History right now. Marvellous!!

Watch Churchill ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... on Documentary right now. And Mario in Serenade on TCM at 10.05 pm.

Disgusting Goblianity

Lindsay Perigo's picture

The Inquisition doco reminds us that Goblianity, no less than Islamogoblinism, is a stinking, stupid, savage superstition. One wonders at the capacity of these horrors to endure.

Many and sharp the num'rous ills
Inwoven with our frame!
More pointed still we make ourselves
Regret, remorse, and shame!
And man, whose heav'n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn, -
Man's inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn!

Mozart

gregster's picture

on Rialto at the moment. Taping it.

Goblianity Alert!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

4-part doco about the Inquisition being repeated from tonight on History Channel, 9.30.

Gaslight

Lindsay Perigo's picture

The superior second version with Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman on TCM right now. Keep an eye out for repeats—hopefully not at 2 in the morning! Smiling

Sky channel CI

gregster's picture

I've been watching footage covering the 9/11 attacks on Sky Crime Investigation channel. Shocking. Makes me sure of my anti islam position.

A Single Man.The most powerful movie I have ever seen.

sevenships's picture

Beef Wellington...

Marcus's picture

Looks like you'll have to update Wikipedia.

"The origin of the name is unclear. One theory is that beef Wellington is named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. Some[who?] have suggested this was due to his love of a dish of beef, truffles, mushrooms, Madeira wine, and pâté cooked in pastry, but there is no evidence to say for sure. [clarification needed] Other accounts simply credit the name to a patriotic chef wanting to give an English name to a variation on the French filet de bœuf en croûte during the Napoleonic Wars. Still another theory is that the dish is not named after the Duke himself, but rather that the finished joint was thought to resemble one of the brown shiny military boots which were named after him."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B...

Another non-PC delight of the two fat fatties is that they often like to go for a spot of shooting in the country.

Yes, the two fatties are

Mark Hubbard's picture

Yes, the two fatties are wonderful ... don't forget the alcoholic one (I think she was the one who died, happily by all accounts).

Part of my malaise at the moment - re that other thread, though more than just this - is I've found I'm getting awful indigestion (and other symptoms I'm a bit squeamish about going into the details of), after eating some dairy products, especially cream and ice cream. I seem to have developed an allergy, am just now making the connections. For a foodie to come to this, it's pathetic and depressing. I love food.

I'm punishing my body with red wine over it, which helps a bit.

Oh shit. Butter! No, it can't be that. I'm sure it's just cream and milk. I'm taking myself off for tests.

Two Fat Ladies

Lindsay Perigo's picture

This classic series is re-running on Food TV every night at 11 pm. Two delightfully politically incorrect old ducks who travel round in a motor-bike and side-car, cooking up a storm for various groups. One of them smokes on air (she died of lung cancer in 1999) and they both routinely trash vegetarians. Last night they did Beef Wellington, pointing out is is named after Wellington, New Zealand, not the Duke of Wellington as is commonly assumed.

Dorian Gray

Olivia's picture

I enjoyed watching this as I never got around to reading the book.

Oscar Wilde's insight of those around him was just superb. The character of Harry was quite obviously the voice of Oscar himself, his humorous comments about marriage being especially salient: Eye

"You know I am not a champion of marriage. The real drawback to marriage is that it makes one unselfish. And unselfish people are colourless. They lack individuality. Still, there are certain temperaments that marriage makes more complex. They retain their egotism, and add to it many other egos. They are forced to have more than one life. They become more highly organized, and to be highly organized is, I should fancy, the object of man's existence."

Harry, the master rationalist/cynic.

...interrupted Dorian. "You must admit, Harry, that women give to men the very gold of their lives."
"Possibly," he sighed, "but they invariably want it back in such very small change. That is the worry. Women, as some witty Frenchman once put it, inspire us with the desire to do masterpieces and always prevent us from carrying them out."

My favourite of Harry's observations;
"To get back my youth I would do anything in the world, except take exercise, get up early, or be respectable."

(These days, I have to do all three - and it's making me feel old.) Eye

'Casablanca' alert!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

8.30 tonight TCM-NZ.

SOLOists, if you haven't seen this, DON'T MISS IT.

Don't miss it even if you have seen it!

Dorian Gray

Lindsay Perigo's picture

1945 movie of Oscar's classic about to show on TCM.

Yeah, Jason, loved that scene from Aviator. As it happened, apparently.

The Aviator -- Senate Hearings Scene

Jason Quintana's picture

I've been on one of my Youtube binges lately... I found a scene I really liked from a movie a few years back. The movie itself is decent. I hope that someday I'll see something like this from a businessman in front of Congress during one of their phony hearings. I especially like the very last part. The uploader here shouldn't have cut away at the end of the hearing....

TCM Alert!!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

Van Gogh bio Lust for Life showing in five minutes!!

The Pacific

Ross Elliot's picture

First episode of the much anticipated Spielberg/Hanks followup to Band of Brothers.

Have to say, it reminded me strongly in tone of The Thin Red Line.

I was not wholly impressed. Still, early days.

If you enjoy BOB...

Ross Elliot's picture

...then the DVD boxed set is a must.

I got it years ago when it was $70 a pop. Since I've watched it about 20 times, that's the best $3.50 per view I've ever spent.

It can now be had for $29, and has a great documentary included.

Mr. D ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

I do not believe that that idea "with reason as it turns out" is correct. I do not think the movie let's the observer discover if the facts as rumored actually took place.

I suppose we'd have to ask the writer, but I thought Father Flynn's guilt was clinched by his response to Sister Aloysius's lie. And also, his earlier denials were brilliantly, subtly unconvincing—one respect in which Hoffman's acting was so skillful.

I was revolted by this film. I think in as much as the theme of child molestation is utterly enraging and replusive there was something worse in the ethos of the film: the sour anti-joy anti-sexual-expression mood of Old Catholicism.

Cripes! I was riveted by it. I don't like Catholicism either, Old or New. (Neither do I like the Deification of Doubt.) But I didn't take either to constitute the "ethos" of the movie; rather the contest between the two. With the did-he/didn't-he pedophile thing providing the battleground, I couldn't put it down, so to speak. And again I say, the acting! That cup-of-tea scene, for instance, really sets my teeth on edge.

This ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... was the best moment for me. Except that Webster gets told to "loosen up" by one of his own. "Give it a rest." If there were Brandroids on that truck they would have called his "outburst" "inappropriate." As I pondered this moral inversion anew I sank into a black misanthropy. If a few more folk had had a few more inappropriate outbursts before the bloody thing started it never *would* have started. But cowardice and appeasement ruled, and still rule. Anyway ...

Interesting. I've done a bit

Mark Hubbard's picture

Interesting.

I've done a bit of Googling, and it was composed by Kamen.

Here's Katherine Jenkins version of it, called Requiem for a Soldier. I have to say her CD version is better as it has more instrumentation, and it is that I really like (as I said, this is not as good as the score leading the program).

I can't find anything about who penned the words of this.

As far as I know Kamen wrote

John Donohue's picture

As far as I know Kamen wrote it specifically for Band of Brothers. He lost a relative in the war and stated this was in memoriam. Mr. Kamen began his career as a classical composer of ballets. He died in 2003 at the age of 55.

If you have knowledge of someone singing it prior to 2003 that would be of interest.

I actually have an irritation with the use of this theme for anything outside the Band of Brothers series. It just seems....wrong. Sacred ground.I heard it floating in the air at the ice skating in the Olympics so it was surely used for someone's program. I did not like that.

Warning: geekish analysis ahead. Close your eyes if you just want to stay in the mood...

This theme is interesting. It is firmly in the key of F with the subdominant (C) important. It consists of two parts of what I label "call and pause" followed by an answering counter. The counter then spins and elevates into a gently surging upward melody that balances on the subdominant, falls, then dramatically breaks into three slow, powerful upward steps, the last of which is in D-minor. The surge/pause at that minor -- the only minor harmony in the entire piece -- breaks your heart. The actual melody note in the d-minor chord is its third, which is F! All it takes in the listener's ear to allow the beautifully piercing sadness of that note to 'come home' is: emotional release. You don't have to move to a different note! You are already back at the root, F. There is a small coda to settle everything deeper into F-major and remove the traces of the minor in the 'ear's eye'. Then the whole thing repeats (chorus louder), descending in the end to a deep, broad final F of peace.

Genius.

Agree about the theme music

Mark Hubbard's picture

Agree about the theme music of Band of Brothers John, that opening score is superb. It must be a recognised piece though, is it? I only ask because I've got ... um.

No, I'll be brave and carry on.

I only ask because I've got Katherine Jenkins on her last CD singing a version of it. (Although the BofB's musical version is far superior to hers. Last year I watched the whole series on DVD, and played the opening most times a couple of times at the end of each program.)

Day of Days

John Donohue's picture

I do not believe that that idea "with reason as it turns out" is correct. I do not think the movie let's the observer discover if the facts as rumored actually took place.

Also, I did not believe in the performance of either Streep or Adams, and I am fans of both. I could not suspend disbelief with them. Hoffman was great. I was revolted by this film. I think in as much as the theme of child molestation is utterly enraging and replusive there was something worse in the ethos of the film: the sour anti-joy anti-sexual-expression mood of Old Catholicism.

As for Band of Brothers, I have been watching again. The finest episode for me is the "Day of Days" in which Easy Company jumps into Normandy and then gets the assignment to take that 4-gun entrenchment. At the end Winters tells Garnier "I am not a Quaker."

The theme music by Michael Kamen, tops my list of film themes that successfully achieve the most with simplicity.

Agree about Band of Brothers.

Mark Hubbard's picture

Agree about Band of Brothers. In my viewing lifetime I think that is the best TV series that I have seen - certainly in terms of production values. I can't wait to see the new Pacific series that will be following - and I'll be on holiday so will be able to actually watch it.

And must get round to seeing Inglorious Basterds (misspelling intentional).

Never heard of Doubts. But don't get SM1.

Oh, and ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

Anyone else seen Doubt on SM1? Excruciatingly excellent acting (and I mean exactly that—the deliberate awkwardness in the tense scenes is excruciatingly well done), dialogue that doesn't have to compete with headbanging, a theme that is rather current, and an epistemology that an Objectivist must hate but nonetheless likes hearing brought out in the open: "I don't have proof but I have certainty" (with reason, as it turns out).

Nice to have been following ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... Band of Brothers on TV1. Tonight's episode highlighting the silence of locals about the concentration camps they knew were in their midst. Reinforced me in my view that the scummiest of the scum are the silent ones.

Jackson...

Ross Elliot's picture

...is a Labour supporter and contributor. You may have seen him schmoozing with Clark & Co. during the 2008 campaign. I can only assume a fair proportion of this massive taxpayer subsidy has gone to Jackson's Weta Workshop since all the movies named below have a large digital component.

Never forget that Clark appointed herself Minister of Arts and then instituted much higher funding for that portfolio. She also had a penchant for signing the works of others and for drawing stick figures. A second-hander mentality if ever there was one.

The Prime Minister was later found by police to have committed a prima facie case of forgery although no charges were laid. She has since confessed to signing at least six other works of art done by others over the past 20 years.

Hurt Locker...

Robert's picture

Forget it. Disjointed, poorly written and contrived crap.

AND the US and UK soldiers in it acted in a transparently stupid fashion. At one point, the SAS patrol is immobilized because they blow a tire and have lost their tire-iron. The excuse? One of the troopers threw it at someone and presumably didn't pick it back up again... Well of course this is the sort of thing you expect from desert trained, experienced soldiers loosing a tire iron while they are on patrol...

I can't even describe how fucking idiotic you'd have to be to invent that plot device.

Ugh! I rented the movie for free with a coupon and I still feel ripped off!

I knew of the Avatar NZ

Mark Hubbard's picture

I knew of the Avatar NZ connection an age ago. You're a bit behind the times Linz: I, the Bokke and Ross have been discussing this via private messaging for a long time Big smile

I didn't realize ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... the NZ connection either. This this morning from Comrade Gerry Brownlee:

 
Hon Gerry Brownlee
Minister for Economic Development

 

24 January 2010

 Media Statement

 

Avatar delivers $307m to New Zealand economy
 
Economic Development Minister Gerry Brownlee says the filming of the Golden Globe Award winning movie Avatar in New Zealand delivered more than $307 million expenditure to the economy.
 
Avatar is on track to be the biggest grossing movie of all time, having overtaken “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” and sold over US$1.6 billion worth of tickets at the box office.
 
"Attracting large budget film productions here offers wider benefits to the economy, including increased opportunities for New Zealanders as well as tourism benefits from having New Zealand locations shown to an international audience," he said. “Avatar has set a new standard for visual effects and this showcases our capability in what is a high value, high technology sector of our economy.”
 
Mr Brownlee said this expenditure was made possible through the incentive of the Large Budget Screen Production Grant (LBSPG), which offers a 15 percent rebate on production expenditure over a certain value within New Zealand. Based on Avatar's qualifying production expenditure of $307m in New Zealand, it received a grant of around $45 million from the LBSPG.
 
Since the inception of the LBSPG in 2003, overseas movie and television productions have spent more than $1.42 billion in New Zealand, which has resulted in grant payments of $189.4 million.
 
Mr Brownlee says it is unlikely these productions would have decided to film in New Zealand if this grant had not been available as most locations offered an incentive to film in their territory or country.
 
"New Zealand's connection to the success of Avatar will continue to deliver huge benefits to the country and will help to attract more large budget productions here in the future."
 
 
ENDS
 
Media Contact: Tim Hurdle 021 659 857
 
 
Q&A on the Large Budget Screen Production Grant
 
How much has Avatar received from the Large Budget Screen Production Grant?
 
To date, Avatar has received a total of $44.69 million from the Large Budget Screen Production Grant.  This is based on qualifying expenditure in New Zealand of $307 million.
 
What other productions have received support recently?
 
Aside from Avatar, other films receiving grants in the year to 30 June 2009 included the films Wolverine, Jumper, The Day the Earth Stood Still, They Came From Upstairs, Underworld 3  and Prince Caspian, as well as the latest in the Power Rangers children’s TV series.  In total, $47.87 million was paid in grants in that year, with qualifying expenditure by those productions totaling $319.49 million. 
 
What productions have been supported in the past ?
 
These include “King Kong”, which got $48.7 million based on qualifying expenditure of $389 million. “The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe” got $16.7 million based on qualifying expenditure of $133.8 million and “Prince Caspian” got $9.5 million based on qualifying expenditure of $71.2 million.

What is the rationale for the grant?
 
The grant aims to increase economic growth by providing a financial incentive to attract large scale screen production to New Zealand, which would be unlikely to come in the absence of such incentives.  The LBSPG provides a comparable incentive to that being offered by other jurisdictions, in particular the Australian Government.
 
Attracting large budget film productions here offers wider benefits to the economy in the form of increased opportunities for New Zealand crew, more use of our digital capabilities (including driving new innovations such as digital effects), the chance to learn from international crew, and the associated tourism benefits from having New Zealand locations shown to an international audience.  These benefits are consistent with the government’s Economic Growth Agenda focus on growing high value services.
As a result the government is committed to the development of a sustainable and vibrant screen production industry in New Zealand, and is keen to promote New Zealand as a film-friendly and competitive location.
How do large screen productions benefit our high tech sector?
 
Films made in New Zealand not only showcase New Zealand’s landscapes, but also our innovative and technological capabilities in ways and on a scale few other projects or products can achieve.
 
There is a specific post-production, digital and visual effects incentive that recognises New Zealand’s strengths in digital and visual effects.  This is intended to act as a catalyst for growth in this sector, to enable New Zealand to attract more of the total international post-production digital and visual effects market.

How well is New Zealand doing in the screen sector?
Very well. The sector received gross revenues of $542 million from overseas sources in the 2008 year. This puts us at number 3 in the world for foreign exchange expenditure behind Canada and the UK.

Do New Zealand crew and actors benefit from the grant?
 
Yes. Recent exit surveys completed by productions applying for the grant have shown approximately 97% employment of New Zealand crew and 93% of New Zealand cast, which is a marked increase over past figures.

How does the Large Budget Screen Production Grant work?

The grant provides a 15 per cent rebate on total qualifying production expenditure where the New Zealand expenditure is more than $15 million.

Applicants must either be:
 
A New Zealand resident company, or
A foreign corporation with a fixed establishment in New Zealand for the purposes of lodging an income tax return (both when it lodges the grant application and when the grant is paid)

 
There is a robust audit process to assess each application for the grant.  All applications received are audited by an independent auditor and compared with Inland Revenue Department receipts. The final decision on the grant payment is made by a panel (led by the New Zealand Film Commission, which takes the lead on administering the grant, and includes industry and government representatives).
 
 
Further Information on LBSPG Criteria
 
http://nzfilm.co.nz/Regulatory...
 
 
 

I didn't realize ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... the NZ connection either. This this morning from Comrade Gerry Brownlee:

 
Hon Gerry Brownlee
Minister for Economic Development

 

24 January 2010

 Media Statement

 

Avatar delivers $307m to New Zealand economy
 
Economic Development Minister Gerry Brownlee says the filming of the Golden Globe Award winning movie Avatar in New Zealand delivered more than $307 million expenditure to the economy.
 
Avatar is on track to be the biggest grossing movie of all time, having overtaken “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” and sold over US$1.6 billion worth of tickets at the box office.
 
"Attracting large budget film productions here offers wider benefits to the economy, including increased opportunities for New Zealanders as well as tourism benefits from having New Zealand locations shown to an international audience," he said. “Avatar has set a new standard for visual effects and this showcases our capability in what is a high value, high technology sector of our economy.”
 
Mr Brownlee said this expenditure was made possible through the incentive of the Large Budget Screen Production Grant (LBSPG), which offers a 15 percent rebate on production expenditure over a certain value within New Zealand. Based on Avatar's qualifying production expenditure of $307m in New Zealand, it received a grant of around $45 million from the LBSPG.
 
Since the inception of the LBSPG in 2003, overseas movie and television productions have spent more than $1.42 billion in New Zealand, which has resulted in grant payments of $189.4 million.
 
Mr Brownlee says it is unlikely these productions would have decided to film in New Zealand if this grant had not been available as most locations offered an incentive to film in their territory or country.
 
"New Zealand's connection to the success of Avatar will continue to deliver huge benefits to the country and will help to attract more large budget productions here in the future."
 
 
ENDS
 
Media Contact: Tim Hurdle 021 659 857
 
 
Q&A on the Large Budget Screen Production Grant
 
How much has Avatar received from the Large Budget Screen Production Grant?
 
To date, Avatar has received a total of $44.69 million from the Large Budget Screen Production Grant.  This is based on qualifying expenditure in New Zealand of $307 million.
 
What other productions have received support recently?
 
Aside from Avatar, other films receiving grants in the year to 30 June 2009 included the films Wolverine, Jumper, The Day the Earth Stood Still, They Came From Upstairs, Underworld 3  and Prince Caspian, as well as the latest in the Power Rangers children’s TV series.  In total, $47.87 million was paid in grants in that year, with qualifying expenditure by those productions totaling $319.49 million. 
 
What productions have been supported in the past ?
 
These include “King Kong”, which got $48.7 million based on qualifying expenditure of $389 million. “The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe” got $16.7 million based on qualifying expenditure of $133.8 million and “Prince Caspian” got $9.5 million based on qualifying expenditure of $71.2 million.

What is the rationale for the grant?
 
The grant aims to increase economic growth by providing a financial incentive to attract large scale screen production to New Zealand, which would be unlikely to come in the absence of such incentives.  The LBSPG provides a comparable incentive to that being offered by other jurisdictions, in particular the Australian Government.
 
Attracting large budget film productions here offers wider benefits to the economy in the form of increased opportunities for New Zealand crew, more use of our digital capabilities (including driving new innovations such as digital effects), the chance to learn from international crew, and the associated tourism benefits from having New Zealand locations shown to an international audience.  These benefits are consistent with the government’s Economic Growth Agenda focus on growing high value services.
As a result the government is committed to the development of a sustainable and vibrant screen production industry in New Zealand, and is keen to promote New Zealand as a film-friendly and competitive location.
How do large screen productions benefit our high tech sector?
 
Films made in New Zealand not only showcase New Zealand’s landscapes, but also our innovative and technological capabilities in ways and on a scale few other projects or products can achieve.
 
There is a specific post-production, digital and visual effects incentive that recognises New Zealand’s strengths in digital and visual effects.  This is intended to act as a catalyst for growth in this sector, to enable New Zealand to attract more of the total international post-production digital and visual effects market.

How well is New Zealand doing in the screen sector?
Very well. The sector received gross revenues of $542 million from overseas sources in the 2008 year. This puts us at number 3 in the world for foreign exchange expenditure behind Canada and the UK.

Do New Zealand crew and actors benefit from the grant?
 
Yes. Recent exit surveys completed by productions applying for the grant have shown approximately 97% employment of New Zealand crew and 93% of New Zealand cast, which is a marked increase over past figures.

How does the Large Budget Screen Production Grant work?

The grant provides a 15 per cent rebate on total qualifying production expenditure where the New Zealand expenditure is more than $15 million.

Applicants must either be:
 
A New Zealand resident company, or
A foreign corporation with a fixed establishment in New Zealand for the purposes of lodging an income tax return (both when it lodges the grant application and when the grant is paid)

 
There is a robust audit process to assess each application for the grant.  All applications received are audited by an independent auditor and compared with Inland Revenue Department receipts. The final decision on the grant payment is made by a panel (led by the New Zealand Film Commission, which takes the lead on administering the grant, and includes industry and government representatives).
 
 
Further Information on LBSPG Criteria
 
http://nzfilm.co.nz/Regulatory...
 
 
 

Kasper: I don't know how NZ

Mark Hubbard's picture

Kasper: I don't know how NZ tax and film specifically work as I've never had to know, but I do 'know' it is one of those 'darling' industries that gets 'special treatment' under the Income Tax Act. Indeed, shysters like Peter Jackson - who should know much better, but he is obviously politically and philosophically an illiterate - are constantly in the press making the 'special case' for the movie industry, it being 'culture' don't you know, thus more equal than plumbing, building, retailing, etc the latter of which are obviously only conducted by cultural Philistines ...

Umm, lost my track (Jackson annoys me so much).

In this case a lot of Avatar was created in Weta Workshops, so I assume they must have had tax credits fenced to them under some provision or other, no doubt penned by Judith Tizard and Helen over fish and chips and a dainty little Rose.

I wonder if Jackson will ever realise that his case for not taxing the film industry - being more films will be created - works for the entire economy? But he wouldn't know a freedom principle even if he was staked to the fiery mountain of Mordor and forced to watch Paul Holmes and Millie campaign for more and more and more and more laws after every court case.

Mark

Kasper's picture

What subsidy for Avatar? What on earth has our government got upto? What has it to do with Avatar?

Ha!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

The Hubbard/Holder/Elliot Axis! Evil

Lindsay...

Ross Elliot's picture

...I *know* that NBN had been discussed. I chose to discuss it anew.

Call me a contrarian if you like, but don't ever lump me in with Hubbard or Holder.

Cool

Oh, tennis, of course I love

Mark Hubbard's picture

Oh, tennis, of course Smiling

I love sport but can't watch golf or tennis.

Meanwhile back to movies, here's a worrying thing: I agree with Green Co-Leader Russel Norman:

Green Party co-leader Russel Norman, is unhappy at the size of the taxpayer subsidy which went to the Hollywood movie Avatar.

Tax credits to the project were worth $45 million, a figure Dr Norman says is excessive.

The film has already grossed more than $2 billion US at the box office.

'Excessive!'.

1 cent of my money taken by force to give to this, or any movie, is obscene.

If you want to test tolerance

John Donohue's picture

If you want to test tolerance for the Older Man fits with Young Woman, a good one is "Love in the Afternoon." Billy Wilder directs Audrey Hepburn with a massive crush on Gary Cooper.

I buy it hook line and sinker but have not found anyone else who does!

Talk about paying attention!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

It's the Australian tennis Open, dear. Sticking out tongue

And I gave Pleasantville a plug ages ago.

Keep up!

Carry on!

I'm adding you to the list,

Mark Hubbard's picture

I'm adding you to the list, currently comprising Hilton Holder and Mark Hubbard, of those whom I need to admonish to read more than just the last post on a thread before jumping on, ...

Well I've not read much of this thread Smiling but re movies, I'd put in a vote for Pleasantville.

I'm afraid the Australian Open is diverting me from TCM right now.

Oh God, golf, hand me the brandy, I can't stand it. (A friend took me out to a golf course a couple of months ago: 22 shots, I hadn't made the first hole. Stupid game, although I'd probably beat that bloody Bokke.)

Ross

Lindsay Perigo's picture

I'm adding you to the list, currently comprising Hilton Holder and Mark Hubbard, of those whom I need to admonish to read more than just the last post on a thread before jumping on, and to keep up and pay attention. We were discussing North by North-West a few posts back.

You see, it's important to keep up and pay attention because that's what lean, handsome and animated men do. If one *doesn't* keep up and pay attention, what are we to conclude about one? Evil

Talking of lean, handsome and animated men, I'm afraid the Australian Open is diverting me from TCM right now. Eye

They did tend...

Ross Elliot's picture

...to be older. I guess the culture and the Hollywood system had something to do with that.

North By Northwest has been on TCM recently with Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint in the leading roles. Grant at 45 was easily the equal in screen appeal of Saint 20 years his junior.

Grant is thoroughly in his element as the hero and lover, and it's hard to see any modern actor in such a role regardless of age. He's lean, handsome and animated and the perfect match for the younger woman.

I can't help but feel that this is a reflection of real romantic life. But, as a man in his forties, I would say that. Eye

Herr Moeller ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

Yes, Crisis was on twice. And they're trailering Executive Suite now for next month. Looks great.

I often wonder who should have done Roark. Quite apart from anything else, Cooper was just too old, though it's notable from watching all these classics that leading men back then tended to be forty-ish and older.

Michael if you liked

John Donohue's picture

Michael if you liked Executive Suite you may like "Patterns" which I liked a couple of posts back.

Linz

Michael Moeller's picture

Crisis was on? That movie is extremely hard to find and not at all well-known. A mind forced to (literally) operate at the point of a gun. Totalitarians forced to rely on men of the mind, and the incompatibility between force and reason. Really a fantastic movie.

Another I've seen again recently is Executive Suite (from the Cameron Hawley novel). William Holden is brilliant and would have made an excellent Howard Roark (in contrast to the wooden Cooper).

Goodness!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

The Kern movie ended with Sinatra singing Ol' Man River ... very well! Smooth rather than sleazy, voice beautifully liquid and supple, on pitch for the most part, and looking extremely handsome. I almost fell for him. Pulled myself together in the nick of time. Such a shame he went on to become so slovenly.

Jerome Kern ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... life story (yeah, right, as usual) on TCM right now.

With all the fuss about

John Donohue's picture

With all the fuss about "patterns" in the IP thread, has anyone see the film "Patterns?"

This short, brilliant film is a creature of Rod Sterling and is in my mind one of the most honest and incisive glimpses into the boardroom of a real company during transition.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt00...

Avail on netficks and rotates in on TCM once in a blue moon.

Robert ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

I'll investigate The Blindside and Taking Chance, with no great hope of satisfaction.

Has anyone else been wallowing in the Cary Grant-fest on TCM today? Arsenic and Old Lace, North by North-West (on right now), and another brilliant one I hadn't seen before: Crisis. Catch it if you can. An excellent anti-tyranny message with some great lines you'd think had been written by Our Lady.

Oooo, I just checked and it's on again next, at 18.45.

Bound!!??!!

Robert's picture

For a second there I thought you were loosing your mind Linz! Then I read that you were watching that poor excuse for a soft porn movie with the sound down. That's probably the only way TO watch it! It was god awful!

If you are looking for a 2009 movie worth watching, I'd recommend The Blindside with Sandra Bullock.

If you want a tear jerker, I'd suggest Taking Chance with Kevin Bacon. The latter is an HBO movie and never made it to theaters.

Other than that 2009 was a crap year for movies. Only these two ever had a shot of making my top 200ish of all time list.

Sure, I enjoyed Transformers 2, but that isn't really a movie so much as a sound and light extravaganza.

The only other 2009 movie that might have a chance is Hurt Locker. Apparently it is the one and only Hollywood-made movie about the Iraq war (I can think of at least a half-dozen) that doesn't take the side of the Islamo-fascists. That in and of itself should warrant watching it -- but I'm not holding my breath.

Another good one

Ross Elliot's picture

Welcome to Mooseport, starring Gene Hackman, apparently his last movie before he retired.

Nothing deep, just one of those solid movies that American cinema turns out with such professional ease.

Glengarry Glen Ross...

Ross Elliot's picture

...was on yesterday. David Mamet adapting his play for a stellar cast.

You don't have to agree with the morality, but the acting was sublime.

Oh yuk!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

Now I'm being serious. I've had the sound down and music playing and was just occasionally glancing at the screen. I just saw someone's finger getting chopped off. Sick filth. Needless to say I've switched channels, even though the movie options are only Elvis or Keanu and History is playing that Life After People crap.

A good night for music!

No dear!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

This is much more explicit. I should have said tits, tongues and twots everywhere. I think it'll turn me gay.

Just a minute ...

It's called Bound.

S&M as well apparently. I haven't caught that part yet.

Oh, yeah?

Ross Elliot's picture

Women in Love, Glenda Jackson?

ATTN ROSS AND ALL GRUBBY HETEROSEXUALS!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

There's some disgusting lesbian movie on MGM right now. Tits everywhere. I don't know which way to turn or whom to complain to. Nor where I left the smelling salts.

Fight Club

Kasper's picture

is a nihilist nirvana. However it is very well done.

Not even ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... the lure of buff Brad bare could induce me to watch Fight Club.

The Great Waltz is on TCM in a few minutes—"bio" of Johann Strauss. That I will be watching!

He's versatile but I think at

Aaron's picture

He's versatile but I think at his best as a bit of a psycho - Kalifornia, or especially Fight Club.

Pitt...

Ross Elliot's picture

...has matured as an actor.

But Kalifornia is silly.

Check out Ocean's Eleven where he's at his best. Sassy, sexy and quite the star.

Kalifornia

Lindsay Perigo's picture

Saw this one today—didn't think I'd enjoy it, but I did. Brad Pitt as the psycho is brilliant.

To Follow Ted on AVATAR

Jmaurone's picture

Some people (we uppity Objectivists who don't know our place, apparently) are being accused of over-intellectizing the theme of AVATAR. But in this case, A is A, and Avatar is B.S. Apparently, Ed Hudgins over-intellectualizes, too, because he just wrote a critical piece of AVATAR:

AVATAR'S SAVAGE MESSAGE

"If you want great special effects and an action-packed popcorn thriller, you'll certainly enjoy Avatar. But hopefully Cameron has so overplayed his hand with his politically correct plot that audiences will leave the comfort of the theater with an appreciation for technology and no desire to flee to a jungle or support the sort of public policies that would reduce our civilization to savagery."
------------

Thanks, Ed. I do have to add that I heard a bit of quiet laughter during the movie...in all the wrong spots. There certainly wasn't any outbreaks of applause or "hell yeah!" moments.

Oh!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

That's called tribalism informed by snobbery.

And the Prince's having to marry the Princess and not Kathy is called Kantianism. Just don't tell Fred Seddon.

A beautiful movie regardless.

Manners piece

gregster's picture

I have the long player soundtrack of Mario and thought he would appear.

My terminology isn't clear. I mean throughout the movie each person had his station. Manners, norms, status, behaviour. As when the other fraternity discovered he was royalty it demanded his joining them, instead of hanging with the more common bunch of drinkers cum singers he had fallen in with.

I think that's clear, I'm surprised you didn't. Smiling

To follow Maurone on Avatar

Ted Keer's picture

Submitted by Jmaurone on Mon, 2009-12-21 16:49.

"Don't be fooled by mixed premises. The left has often claimed to defend civil liberties and other issues that converge with libertarian politics. If you've read Riggenbach's IN PRAISE OF DECADENCE, you can even see the libertarian strain among hippies that broke off into the Libertarian Party. Rock musicians are a notorious mix of liberty and socialism. Hell, even Obama denies he's a socialist. Doesn't make him Libertarian."

Paraphrasing the chapter "Efficient Thinking" in The Vision of Ayn Rand:

Suppose you're watching a movie in which the hero seems to be an individualist, and you have been starved for such a movie. In the first chapter, the hero turns down a very good job, rather than conform to the ideas of others. You feel a strong emotion of admiration and pleasure, and this emotion, quite validly, is important to you. It's the kind of emotion you do want to feel.

Well, at this point, you can do one of two things. You can continue to perceive, to see what the movie is about, to judge what you're viewing — or you can lose yourself in the pleasure you feel, focus only on it, look only for ways to maintain it, ignoring and evading any evidence that might contradict it.

Then, as you continue watching, the hero is shown establishing an socialist [environmentalist] cooperative, which, he says, will once and for all solve the problem of jobs [preserving nature] for everyone. Well, if your mind is functioning rationally, you will perceive that you have made a mistake — that is, that whatever this movie is preaching it isn't individualism. But, if you've focused on maintaining your emotion at any price, then you'll rationalize it by any means possible. You'll tell yourself that the hero really believes in his ideal, and this makes him an individualist; or that he's fighting for his idea, and this makes him an individualist, so that he's still a hero, et cetera, etc., etc. And you can watch the whole movie this way, reading into it what you want to see, explaining away what doesn't fit your desires, blinding yourself, destroying your perception for the sake of your emotion. A year later you might see the same movie in a different mood and ask yourself, in helpless amazement: "Why did I think what I thought?"

Gregster ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

I always assume too much and forget how old I am. I assume people know The Student Prince features Mario's voice only. He walked out after the director told him his singing was too emotional. (The regime of Louis B. Mayer had been supplanted by that of Dore Schary, a pomowanker who hated musicals and hated Lanza with a ... well, something almost resembling passion! Eye) They still used his pre-records on the soundtrack, and of course, his singing was the best thing about the movie.

What is a "manners piece"?

Student Prince

gregster's picture

I was disappointed that Mario wasn't in it. What a manners piece that was. Haven't quite got to the end, it was getting late. Fair bit of drinking involved, which was good.

Much of the media...

Marcus's picture

...was sniping before the film came out that James Cameron spent so much money just to make 'the squashed Smurfs'.

I suppose that was a comment on the look of the aliens rather than the story-line, or is there something else in that description?

If it really does have Hippy values they should all be cooing now that it has been released.

Haven't heard much excitement about it over here in the UK though.
......................................................................................................................

Update: UK leftie Blogger calls the film racist!!!

"James Cameron has been very open about the politics behind Avatar. It’s about how “greed and imperialism tend to destroy the environment,” he said in a recent interview. “It’s a way of looking back on ourselves from this other world.”

But that,

"If we look at his version of our planet, however, the view is overwhelmingly repellent. Pandora is to Cameron what Africa was to Joseph Conrad – it’s another, fictional ‘Heart of Darkness’, a place where a cruel imperial power subjects what is (perhaps unwittingly) depicted as a lesser race."

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/n...

Yes but...

Frediano's picture

Turns out that when Jefferson paid Boneparte 15 million dollars for all that land West of the Mississippi, doubling the size of his country in one hit, it equated to 3 cents per acre!

... does that mean land is worth more now, or our money less? Yikes...

Apply that to the stock market: in a period when the value of the dollar as a value-proxy is dropping faster than the value in the marketplace, the stock market still goes 'up' ... when measured in units of value-proxies.

Is that good economic news? It is if we can sell it as good economic news...

Aha! They are mirror avatars...

Frediano's picture

So, the Na'vi are really the anti - Ivan.

But, it's not clear if 'Ivan' is Ivan Boesky, or Ivan Ivanovitch.

Well, then, I'll just have to rent it.

Thanks Hilton and Joe. Yes,

Mark Hubbard's picture

Thanks Hilton and Joe. Yes, that is pretty much as I had surmised before the Mises post (that site really is patchy).

Just a pity with great technology like this, it can't be applied to great cinema, rather than kiddies stuff. And the glasses, I hate them.

I hope someone is still working on holographic cinema.

Don't be fooled...

Jmaurone's picture

by mixed premises. The left has often claimed to defend civil liberties and other issues that converge with libertarian politics. If you've read Riggenbach's IN PRAISE OF DECADENCE, you can even see the libertarian strain among hippies that broke off into the Libertarian Party. Rock musicians are a notorious mix of liberty and socialism.

Hell, even Obama denies he's a socialist. Doesn't make him Libertarian.

Normally, for something like this, I'd have seen this by now and posted my review. But with this Christmas Eve Health Care Stocking Stuff coming up, my focus is currently on the real-time fight. Pencil's down, turn in your papers now...we're all about to be graded.

AVATAR

HWH's picture

I've actually seen it twice now Mark, and yes, The Na'vi obviously do defend their property rights, but do you think the agressors may be any other than "Big business" in tandem with a bunch of "Atilla-esque" mercenaries...'fraid not.

The Na'vi are obviously portrayed as noble savages, completely in tune with the vibes of Gaya (they even come complete with organic USB connectivity straight into the memory banks of "Eya" herself), whereas the callous selfish greedy bastard of a CEO has no appreciation for the subtleties of the relationship between the Na'vi and Eya, the one "God" who is made up of all living things. The "allmighty Dollar" is his only concern. Yawn Yawn

In reality the plot is a leftie cum hippie wankfest, but please dont let it put you off, the visual experience is beyond belief.

Avatar

Mark Hubbard's picture

Before I start, I've not seen it yet - I'm doing so Thursday morning.

However, from the story line as I've heard it I was expecting to hate it, that is, anti-big business, pushing the environmentalism (= communism) line, etc. That is, I am only going to see how good the special effects are.

But then I see this article in Mises (recognising that Mises.org can be hit and miss from post to post):

http://blog.mises.org/archives...

'Avatar is Great and Libertarian'.

And at its core it was very libertarian: it was about a group of people (the Na'vi) defending their property rights on ...

the plot is about property rights. In particular, the property rights of the Na'vi, in an established tree-city that they have clearly homesteaded. The Na'vi are not just some uncivilized savages as some curmudgeonly reviewers imply; they live they way they do because of the wondrous bounty of their strange world and some unique features it has--which, again, I can say little of without spoiling, but suffice to say it's grounded in reality and extrapolative science fiction, not some quasi-mystical nonsense.

Anybody seen it yet? Thoughts?

From the look ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... of young Adam Rickitt in last night's edition I'd say this is an old series. Still a propos though.

I love it when Donald Sinden does one of his blustery cameos. Haven't seen him in a couple of weeks.

One of The Professionals

gregster's picture

Good cop show.

JJD...

Ross Elliot's picture

...is a thoroughly good show, featuring Martin Shaw as the judge.

Combines the right mix of legal and human drama.

Shaw's a wonderful actor.

Brilliant episode ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

... of Judge John Deed on Prime tonight. He excoriated the cult of celebrity as "the mindless in pursuit of the talentless" and the press for being so wantonly beholden to it. Unfortunately one suspects the Judge's solution might be some kind of regulation, but as far as they went, his comments were spot on.

Old Man River

Sandi's picture

I even loved that as a teenager!

Show Boat!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

The 1936 version with Paul Robeson, now showing, TCM.

Also...

Ross Elliot's picture

...the History Channel has a 7-parter in the form of essays on Christianity. I caught the last one on the history of Antisemitism in the Church. Tremendous, edifying stuff.

You know, these twats who rail against the Jews would do well to see where their Gothic, inane views come from. If it wasn't so vicious and cruel, it would be laughable.

Yep...

Ross Elliot's picture

..the L&C thing is pretty well done. Stephen Ambrose is featured, who wrote Undaunted Courage, one of my fave L&C books. Get it.

He also wrote the D-Day book upon which Saving Private Ryan was resourced, and Band of Brothers. Tremendous history writing. Anal retentives would call it popular history, but I call it heroic.

Good two-part history of Eisenhower. Also Nixon. He's dead just now.

Marcus ...

Lindsay Perigo's picture

Pay attention! I said a plague on *all* such savagery and superstition.

But it's time for a major assault on Catholicism in particular. Those evil bastards should all have been done for when Pope Paul IV's image was despatched to the bottom of the Tiber.

It was not just the Catholic Church...

Marcus's picture

...doing such things.

Look up the history of 'Vlad the Impaler' or 'Ivan the Terrible' for example.

You mean the Catholic Church are a bunch of hypocrites? We knew that.

There is modern gruesome torture too, Pol Pot in Cambodia for example.

And similar things are still occurring to this day in North Korea!

Of course the Catholic Church spends so much time preaching against the evils of consumerism and global warming, they don't even worry about such things still happening in the world.

Ooops!

Lindsay Perigo's picture

I've just been looking this Inquisition series up. Evidently last night's was Pt 3, not Pt 2. Obviously I missed Pt 1. Pt 3 focussed on the Roman Inquisition. It told the story, among many others, of a Venetian heretic, a young law student who was sympathetic to Luther, who was boiled in a mixture of oil, tar and turpentine. It took him 15 minutes to die.

In looking up the TV series I came across this. I'd long ago, as a child in fact, read Ingersoll's horrific account of the methods of torture used during the Inquisition, but something like this really brings the unforgivable and beyond-evil nature of it home. Unless reminded, one forgets just what filth the Catholic Church, the Church of Pedophilia, is. And of course, you get ostensibly secular Inquisitionists like speaker-banner Robert Campbell blanching at my description. Funny that.

A plague on all such savagery and superstition, including Protestant:

Best selling DVD's of the decade...

Marcus's picture

1. Mamma Mia!

2. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Why buy the last two films, but not the first one? Must be the Obama groupies!)

3. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (ditto)

4. Planet Earth (BBC TV series by Attenbother)

5. The Dark Knight (over-hyped crap)

6. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

7. The Bourne Ultimatum (over-hyped crap)

8. Star Wars Trilogy

9. Band Of Brothers

10. Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (over-hyped crap)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/tec...

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