Rewritten: Children Nowadays Were Horrible.

Mark Hubbard's picture
Submitted by Mark Hubbard on Thu, 2012-07-26 05:10

From best of Life Behind the IRon Drape.

Excerpt: George Orwell, 1984:

"Nearly all children nowadays were horrible. What was worst of all was that by means of such organizations as the Spies they were systematically turned into ungovernable little savages, and yet this produced in them no tendency whatever to rebel against the discipline of the Party. On the contrary, they adored the Party and everything connected with it… All their ferocity was turned outwards, against the enemies of the State, against foreigners, traitors, saboteurs, thought-criminals. It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children."

Excerpt: The Telegraph, 2012:

School children are being encouraged by HM Revenue and Customs to tell their teachers if they know of anyone "in their local area" who is not paying their fair share of tax … One module, headlined “tax responsibilities of a good citizen”, aims to help teenagers “understand the obligations if being a good citizen and discuss what should happen to those who are not prepared to work under such obligations”. One lesson plan – targeted at 14 to 16 year olds … continues: “Show class the remaining factfile slides on tax evasion. What do students think of those who refuse to pay tax … ? “Can they think of any example they may have heard of in their local area?”

I’ve written before on how the founder of the Italian Communist Party, Antonio Gramsci, told his fellow revolutionaries that the West would not be won on the battle field, but they must instead play the long game: slowly infiltrate the schools, and capture the minds of the young.

He would be a happy man today.

Look at the ‘good’ citizens’, above, these children are taught to be in our schools, with all these ‘obligations’ to each other. And so strong is the programming, that I am confident more than ninety percent of those reading this would feel, deep down, that they have to agree with the teachers’ ethic here, with what this tax course in the schools is founded on: that self-sacrifice for the common good of all, is a noble thing, and the needs of others are what social democracies must hold at their centre.

But it’s a magic trick, an illusion, that’s been done in our minds by Gramsci, a linguistic sleight of hand, all the more evil because it initially appeals to our ‘better natures’. All we need do to understand it, see the reality of it, is change the focus, the narrator, and see what it really says, which is that for you to live your life, it is acceptable that the lives of others, total strangers, be sacrificed to you, their pursuit of happiness destroyed for you, and that the state will initiate force to back you up in this, and mince up the livelihoods, and freedom, of those who will not bow down to you. And part of being a good citizen, now, is for you to dob these people in, so they can be dealt to.

Free men know that the civilised society is not based on such an extinguishment of life, but founded on a bed-rock of the non-initiation of force, particularly the state against the people, and on each individual being responsible for themselves, and self-reliant. That a civilised society works on the natural love and affection between families and loved ones, on compassion and charity freely given for strangers, and on voluntarism.

So these are not ‘good citizens’ being trained in this course, on their social obligations; just as in the Orwell quote, these are spies, these truly are little savages. When I went to school, at the age of these children, William Golding’s frightening novel, Lord of the Flies, was on the curriculum. Just over thirty years later, the curriculum has been based on it.

Thus, aptly, I shall end with another quote from Orwell’s novel, and I’ve used it before:

If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face — forever.


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The offending parts...

Marcus's picture

...that have been flagged up have just been put up on their website.

The article says HR&C have

Mark Hubbard's picture

The article says HR&C have been doing such modules for teachers and financial literacy courses 'for years' - why have they been doing that if not used?

And though this has become a side show, please link your evidence for stating this hasn't been taught anywhere yet? And despite that, does it concern you that these have been written obviously for use by teachers (either now or in the future)? The point is, these modules were written for use.

Exactly...

Marcus's picture

...you don't know when, how or if this stuff is being taught in English schools. Yet you seem to know what effect it is having.

Anyway, as it has just been flagged up in the media by civitas - the points of concern haven't been taught anywhere yet.

Curriculum is what is taught

Mark Hubbard's picture

Curriculum is what is taught in schools, Marcus. Did you read the link? Proof that they offered this:

The first hint in the article came from this:

HMRC has set up teaching modules to guide children through the hazards of pay as you earn and National Insurance contributions. ... One lesson plan – targeted at 14 to 16 year olds – requires students to “discuss whether it is good to pay the tax we do, considering the benefits we receive. If it is good, then why do people try not to pay?”

Even IRD in NZ would only spend time writing tax modules for schools if they were actually going to be used in schools (although here, at least, I don't believe they do this).

Anyway, back to the question, then there was the real give-away:


An HMRC spokesman said: "HMRC has been providing basic information for many years to teachers to use when teaching financial education in classrooms.

Now, smack me across the head with a tax return, but I read that as saying these modules, written as a resource for teachers in schools, are being taught in schools by teachers for, quote, 'financial education in classrooms'. Have I actually, first hand, seen this being done inside a British school? No. But, I wasn't at the eventing ring in London last night, either, yet still know the NZ team won a bronze. How many nth degrees do we have to keep going on this?

The schools have not offered it, have they?

Marcus's picture

In formal education, a curriculum is the set of courses, and their content, offered at a school or university.

Show me proof that they have offered this and we can discuss this further.

Dictionary definition:

Mark Hubbard's picture

Dictionary definition: subject studied in school.

Mark...

Marcus's picture

...what's your definition of curriculum?

Well what's this then? One

Mark Hubbard's picture

Well what's this then?

One module, headlined “tax responsibilities of a good citizen”, aims to help teenagers “understand the obligations if being a good citizen and discuss what should happen to those who are not prepared to work under such obligations”. One lesson plan – targeted at 14 to 16 year olds … continues: “Show class the remaining factfile slides on tax evasion. What do students think of those who refuse to pay tax … ? “Can they think of any example they may have heard of in their local area?”

Note how it says, 'show class' ....

No...

Marcus's picture

...because it is not in the curriculum.

Marcus

Mark Hubbard's picture

Firstly, my post is factually correct, unless the Telegraph article is not? Can you prove the latter?

But, more importantly, let's go to the heart of my post, which is what constitutes a good citizen, as being given in the curriculum reported, forgetting the dobbing in component. This curriculum is teaching teenagers that the needs of total strangers create an obligation on each individual, and that the state has a duty to enforce the sacrifice signified in that obligation. Do you accept that (on any level)?

Mark...

Marcus's picture

...you seem to be suffering from "believing everything you read" syndrome.

Marcus

Mark Hubbard's picture

You seem to be suffering some type of state schooled comprehension deficit on my threads. You've got the viewpoint wrong: the last thing I'm saying is that children are lining up to be good citizens; I'm saying they're being taught, at a pre-rebellion, early age, to be good citizens. And even before that, I'm simply showing what society deems a good citizen to be.

You seem very taut; have a wine, and chill.

Mark has not considered...

Marcus's picture

...and perhaps he doesn't want to consider that most children at this age rebel against authority.

It's not for nothing being a left-wing radical like Marx, or an anti-capitalist eco-warrior is trendy or if that's too cerebral listening to some shock rock music like Marilyn Manson.

According to Mark though children are lining up to be good citizens.

Ah

Brant Gaede's picture

Maybe so. Let's hope the situation doesn't become a fulmination.

--Brant

Brant, my point is this

Mark Hubbard's picture

Brant, my point is this largely has happened?

Jesus, Mark

Brant Gaede's picture

Even I don't think that's going to happen. I think the human race is going to self evolve thanks to technology interfacing and all the shit we see today will be blown away. The future is going to have its own, unique problems. Note the rate of accelerating change. Is it in itself a bubble? Maybe.

--Brant

Thanks Brant. I've now

Mark Hubbard's picture

Thanks Brant.

I've now written a new ending for it.

Thanks

Brant Gaede's picture

Thanks, Mark, for putting up this ironic "Horror File" material. Orwell was a genius.

--Brant

More heat than light...

Marcus's picture

An HMRC spokesman said: 'HMRC has been providing basic information for many years to teachers to use when teaching financial education in classrooms.

'We certainly don't use this to collect information on tax evaders from children.

'These materials are solely designed to help children to learn about how tax works in Britain.'
......
One lesson invites children to think of anyone 'in their local area' who may have been paying too little.

The move was criticised by think tank Civitas, whose director David Green said it sounded 'a bit too "Big Brotherish"'.

He told the Daily Telegraph: 'People "in their local area" are most likely to be parents or close relatives.

'Turning children into state spies is un-British.'

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