Objectivism

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/solopsweb/solopassion.com/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Changing the Culture

sjw's picture
Submitted by sjw on Sat, 2006-03-11 20:38

At the heart of the premier Objectivist organizations, ARI & TOC, is a common goal and purpose: to change the culture to be pro-reason, pro-individualism, pro-freedom:

  • ARI: "ARI seeks to promote these principles, spearheading a 'cultural renaissance' that will reverse the anti-reason, anti-individualism, anti-freedom, anti-capitalist trends in today's culture. The major battleground in this fight for reason and capitalism is the educational institutions-high schools, and above all, the universities, where students learn the ideas that shape their lives.”
  • TOC: "The goal of The Objectivist Center is to help create a new culture in our society, a culture in tune with the entrepreneurial spirit of the new economy, a culture that affirms the core Objectivist values of reason, individualism, freedom, and achievement."
Recent Comments:
I suspect that ARI and TOC — by rinkuhero on Tue, 2006-03-14 02:05
Fundamentals — by sjw on Mon, 2006-03-13 17:18
Refutation — by rinkuhero on Mon, 2006-03-13 12:17

( categories: )

The Nature of Poison

Casey's picture
Submitted by Casey on Tue, 2006-02-21 01:37

When my friend, James Valliant, had his book sent to the publishers, the galleys completed and the jacket copy and cover decided upon, I expected to have only limited involvement thereafter. A review posted at Amazon and Barnes & Noble, a response to some flagrantly erroneous articles that recycled lies about Ayn Rand that the Brandens told—that was about the extent of the contribution I anticipated after the book was out there for all the world to see and read.

However, I was surprised by the nature of the posts that were slamming the book before it was published at the old SOLOHQ site, where Barbara Branden herself held court, considering this was a site comprising individuals who claimed to admire Rand, or at least her novels and ideas.

Recent Comments:
Perspective — by Holly Valliant on Mon, 2006-03-06 05:08
Suspicious? — by sjw on Sun, 2006-03-05 19:20
Ok Shayne — by Michael Moeller on Fri, 2006-03-03 20:05

( categories: )

Younkins on Hegel

seddon's picture
Submitted by seddon on Sat, 2006-02-18 03:04

Ed,

Thanks for your article on Hegel. Just a few thoughts.

1. “Kant thus proposed the paradox that the world consists of antinomies—contradictions that cannot be resolved.” But they can be resolved and Kant himself proposed the resolution. Hence the title of Section VI, in Book II, chapter II, to wit: “Transcendental Idealism as the Key to Solving the Cosmological Dialectic.” (i.e., antinomies).

2. “the State, . . . is an end in itself.” And yet Hegel can write, human beings “are ends in themselves—not merely formally, as is the world of other living beings, whose individual life is essentially subordinate to that of man and is properly used us as an instrument. Men, on the contrary, are ends in themselves in regard to the content of the end. This defines those elements which we demand to be exempt from the category of means: morality, ethics, religion. [Remember that for Hegel, religion is a primitive form of philosophy.] Man is an end in himself. (REASON IN HISTORY, 44-5)

Recent Comments:
Hegel — by Neil Parille on Sun, 2006-02-19 13:18

( categories: )

Lennox on Axioms

seddon's picture
Submitted by seddon on Tue, 2006-02-14 15:16

In this article I would like to raise five points about Jim Lennox’s paper, “Ayn Rand as Aristotelian: Axioms and their Validation,” which he delivered at the American Philosophical Association meeting in New York City on Dec. 29, 2005.

1. THE NECESSITY OF AXIOMS: On p. 3 of his paper Lennox quotes Rand approvingly, (All four speakers ALWAYS quote Rand approvingly) “But what will come out of this is an arrangement of the whole in a logical system, proceeding from a few axioms in a succession of logical theorems. The axioms will be necessary—even mathematics has them—[because sic.] you can’t build something on nothing. . . .(Harriman 1997, 72) Lennox then gives the “you can’t get something from nothing” argument. You need axioms because you can’t get something from nothing. But he gives no argument for identifying the “something” as “axioms.” He also gives no argument for equating a non-axiomatic foundation with nothing.


( categories: )

Two ARI Talks - Bernstein on Capitalism and Binswanger on Immigration - at USC

AdamReed's picture
Submitted by AdamReed on Fri, 2006-02-10 08:15

I recently received the following announcement from David Gulbraa of ARI:

We wanted to alert you about two upcoming free live events at USC in Los
Angeles.

University of Southern California
Friday, February 17, 2006
Global Capitalism: The Solution to World Oppression and Poverty
Dr. Andrew Bernstein
SGM (Seeley G. Mudd) 123
6:30 PM, Doors open at 6:00 PM
This event is FREE to the public.

Description:
Capitalism is the system of individual rights. The enormous success of
capitalism in Asia in the 20th century's second half, and the beginning of its
positive impact in contemporary Latin America add to the evidence accumulated in


( categories: )

Daily Linz 25—SOLO, TOC ... and KASS!

Lindsay Perigo's picture
Submitted by Lindsay Perigo on Thu, 2006-02-09 03:19

Note from Linz—Yes, I'm cheating. This is a reprise. I thought with all the discussion raging here about PARC, ARI, TOC, SOLO, the Brandens, etc., and the TOC Summer Seminar coming up, with me among the presenters, it would be timely to re-run this. It's reprinted exactly as it orginally appeared—no ARI-type airbrushing! Smiling

I have just returned to New Zealand from The Objectivist Center's Summer Seminar in Vancouver. I am feeling the blues that must inevitably accompany a return to the world of nihilism from one of exuberant rationality. Yes, "exuberant"! Yes, TOC! Just as you, dear reader, thought you'd never see me saying that, so too did I never think I'd be writing it. Fact is, the Seminar was a blast.

Recent Comments:
Kassless — by James Heaps-Nelson on Fri, 2006-02-10 18:24
Thanks for the thanks! :-) — by Lindsay Perigo on Fri, 2006-02-10 17:41
TOC, SOLO and KASS — by James Heaps-Nelson on Fri, 2006-02-10 15:15

( categories: )

Daily Linz 24 - It's the Integration, Stoopid!

Lindsay Perigo's picture
Submitted by Lindsay Perigo on Wed, 2006-02-08 03:52

“A concept is a mental integration of two or more units possessing the same distinguishing characteristic(Drunk, with their particular measurements omitted.”

–—Ayn Rand, Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology

Somewhere in his prodigious output Leonard Peikoff tells a hypothetical story that is highly instructive. From memory, it goes like this: A group of men sit around and discuss whether it would be moral to rob a bank. The discussion rapidly degenerates into competing suggestions as to which bank might be the most practical to rob—which offers the most loot, the most lax security, the quickest escape route, etc.. The issue of whether they should or should not rob a bank becomes an issue of “Which bank are we talking about?” No one speaks up to say, “Wait a minute! We shouldn’t even be having this discussion. Robbing any bank would be wrong! It would represent the taking of other people’s property, without their permission, by force—force initiated by us. Initiating force is always wrong, if human life is our standard of right and wrong.” To say such a thing would require an ability to derive abstract principles from concrete life experiences and repair to those principles in evaluating possible future actions. It would require the identification of the same distinguishing characteristic in all the proposed robberies—initiated force—and their integration into the concept “wrong,” with a few narrower integrations along the way. Alas, people generally just don’t think that way any more. They don’t think in principles; they don’t integrate—the point of Peikoff’s story.

Recent Comments:
Thanks John — by Lanza Morio on Wed, 2006-03-01 07:25
Proposition Accepted — by Bikemessenger on Sat, 2006-02-11 10:20
Agree to Disagree... — by jtgagnon on Fri, 2006-02-10 18:11

( categories: )

Need Appropriate Suggestions to Understand Philosophy

Wazir Ali Baber's picture
Submitted by Wazir Ali Baber on Thu, 2005-12-29 20:47

Hi...

I need an appropraite suggestions to understand Philosophy and also refer me some basic books as i can be able to improve my knowledge in this subject and i want also be expert because i got more intrest in this field..

I am studying Philosophy as my major subject in the university. So do fever me

Recent Comments:
I've re-categorised this post ... — by Duncan Bayne on Mon, 2006-01-09 09:23
Philosophy — by Jason Quintana on Thu, 2005-12-29 23:04

( categories: )

Ayn-Rand: My Fiction-Writing Teacher

Erika Holzer's picture
Submitted by Erika Holzer on Wed, 2005-12-21 01:50

“Ayn Rand: My Fiction-Writing Teacher,” by Erika Holzer. Madison Press, 2005, 303 pages.

Reviewed by Stephen Cox

Ayn Rand (1905-1982) was her generation’s largest influence on libertarian thought. She was also a powerful novelist and a king-sized American personality. In this year of Rand’s centennial, many of her friends and acquaintances are communicating their memories of her. I think it’s especially fitting that Erika Holzer, herself a novelist (“Double Crossing,” 1983, and “Eye for an Eye,” 1994), has contributed a memoir of Rand as a writing teacher. To tell the truth, I am on record as one of the many people who urged Holzer to do it.


( categories: )

Esthetics

administrator's picture
Submitted by administrator on Wed, 2005-11-30 11:27

Woman in Blue, Michael Newberry, 1981

What is Esthetics?

Esthetics is the study of art. It includes what art consists of, as well as the purpose behind it. Does art consist of music, literature, and painting? Or does it include a good engineering solution, or a beautiful sunset? These are the questions that aimed at in esthetics. It also studies methods of evaluating art, and allows judgments of the art. Is art in the eye of the beholder? Does anything that appeals to you fit under the umbrella of art? Or does it have a specific nature? Does it accomplish a goal?


( categories: )

Politics

administrator's picture
Submitted by administrator on Wed, 2005-11-30 11:26

What is Politics?

Politics is ethics applied to a group of people.

Why is this Important?

Politics tells you how a society must be set up and how one should act within a society. Except for hermits, this comes up a lot.

What is a rational Politics?

The requirement for a political system is that the individuals within that system are allowed to fully function according to their nature. If that's not the case, they will either rebel, as in Czarist Russia, or the system will eventually collapse, as in Communist Russia.

Reason is man's prime means of survival. A human being can not survive in an environment where reason is ineffective, and will thrive or starve to a degree in proportion to the effectiveness of reason. This means that the prime goal of a political system must be the preservation and enabling of the faculty of reason.


( categories: )

Ethics

administrator's picture
Submitted by administrator on Wed, 2005-11-30 11:22

What is Ethics?

Ethics is the branch of study dealing with what is the proper course of action for man. It answers the question, "What do I do?" It is the study of right and wrong in human endeavors. At a more fundamental level, it is the method by which we categorize our values and pursue them. Do we pursue our own happiness, or do we sacrifice ourselves to a greater cause? Is that foundation of ethics based on the Bible, or on the very nature of man himself, or neither?

Why is Ethics important?

Ethics is a requirement for human life. It is our means of deciding a course of action. Without it, our actions would be random and aimless. There would be no way to work towards a goal because there would be no way to pick between a limitless number of goals. Even with an ethical standard, we may be unable to pursue our goals with the possibility of success. To the degree which a rational ethical standard is taken, we are able to correctly organize our goals and actions to accomplish our most important values. Any flaw in our ethics will reduce our ability to be successful in our endeavors.


( categories: )

Epistemology

administrator's picture
Submitted by administrator on Wed, 2005-11-30 11:19

What is Epistemology?

Epistemology is the study of our method of acquiring knowledge. It answers the question, "How do we know?" It encompasses the nature of concepts, the constructing of concepts, the validity of the senses, logical reasoning, as well as thoughts, ideas, memories, emotions, and all things mental. It is concerned with how our minds are related to reality, and whether these relationships are valid or invalid.

Why is Epistemology important?

Epistemology is the explanation of how we think. It is required in order to be able to determine the true from the false, by determining a proper method of evaluation. It is needed in order to use and obtain knowledge of the world around us. Without epistemology, we could not think. More specifically, we would have no reason to believe our thinking was productive or correct, as opposed to random images flashing before our mind. With an incorrect epistemology, we would not be able to distinguish truth from error. The consequences are obvious. The degree to which our epistemology is correct is the degree to which we could understand reality, and the degree to which we could use that knowledge to promote our lives and goals. Flaws in epistemology will make it harder to accomplish anything.


( categories: )

Metaphysics

administrator's picture
Submitted by administrator on Wed, 2005-11-30 11:15

What is Metaphysics?

Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy responsible for the study of existence. It is the foundation of a worldview. It answers the question "What is?" It encompasses everything that exists, as well as the nature of existence itself. It says whether the world is real, or merely an illusion. It is a fundamental view of the world around us.

Why is Metaphysics important?

Metaphysics is the foundation of philosophy. Without an explanation or an interpretation of the world around us, we would be helpless to deal with reality. We could not feed ourselves, or act to preserve our lives. The degree to which our metaphysical worldview is correct is the degree to which we are able to comprehend the world, and act accordingly. Without this firm foundation, all knowledge becomes suspect. Any flaw in our view of reality will make it more difficult to live.


( categories: )

Objectivism 101

administrator's picture
Submitted by administrator on Wed, 2005-11-30 11:10

This Objectivism 101 section is a series of pages mirrored from another site, Importance of Philosophy. Here you will find articles about many aspects of and relating to Objectivism. The articles are extensively hyper-linked, so you can pretty much dive in anywhere and proceed from there. There is also a concept chart that shows graphically how some of the major ideas in Objectivism relate to one another.

These articles are divided up among the five branches of philosophy. Each branch studies a particular area and attempts to provide answers to some basic question.


( categories: )

Objectivism

Lindsay Perigo's picture
Submitted by Lindsay Perigo on Wed, 2005-11-30 10:47

What is Objectivism?

Let its founder speak first. Asked to specify Objectivism's essentials standing on one foot, Ayn Rand, standing on one foot, said:

Recent Comments:
I would have — by Brant Gaede on Thu, 2010-02-04 17:25
Ah well Brant... — by Olivia on Thu, 2010-02-04 08:28
Solved! — by Brant Gaede on Thu, 2010-02-04 02:32

( categories: )
Syndicate content